September 3: an important date in American and world history

Why is it important to remember history?

Let us ask ourselves, ‘What kind of people do we think we are?’ And let us answer, ‘Free people, worthy of freedom and determined not only to remain so but to help others gain their freedom as well.’ ~~ Ronald Reagan

Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him. ~~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong – these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history. ~~ Winston Churchill

Did you know that on this date in 1783, the American Revolution officially ended and confirmed America’s status as a sovereign nation? According to history.com:

The American Revolution officially comes to an end when representatives of the United States, Great Britain, Spain and France sign the Treaty of Paris on September 3, 1783. The signing signified America’s status as a free nation, as Britain formally recognized the independence of its 13 former American colonies, and the boundaries of the new republic were agreed upon: Floridanorth to the Great Lakes and the Atlantic coast west to the Mississippi River. (Read more at: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history).

Also on this date in 1939, the English Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain declared war on Germany after that country refused to withdraw from Poland, which it had invaded on September 1. According to worldwar2facts.org:

The typical date agreed upon by historians to answer the question of when did World War 2 start is September 1st, 1939. This is the date that Germany invaded Poland; however, France and Great Britain did not declare war on the Germans until September 3rd. In the Far East, the start of the Second Sino-Japanese War occurred on July 7th, 1937 when the Japanese invaded China is referred to by many in the Far East as the beginning of World War 2 after looking back on history. Prior to this, the Japanese had invaded Manchuria in 1931 which is also considered part of the beginning of WW2 in the Pacific Theater.

 

History